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June 1998 Issue
by Chris Schaefer
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When writing this article, I tried to think long and hard on a particular Father's Day of my childhood; one that sticks out in my mind the most. And what I came to realize was that no one particular year was more special than any other. With this in mind, I decided on a more practical approach. At first I thought there must be some common Father's Day treat; something celebrated by every family across the United States. Whether it be a particular meal or outing, a gift or gesture.

Was it cologne? Golf balls? A Saturday afternoon at the ballpark with family at hand? Maybe it was a tie? A fancy seven course meal? Then it dawned upon me: over the years of my youth, we had done it all. From the traditional family night in to the ostentatious family night out, and everything in between. Obviously this left me no further than I had started. So with wits at hand, I present to you a "Dream Father's Day."

Resting on the mild while staring at the face of bare-boned excitement and whatever seems to fit in the middle, this recipe is not complete until you, the reader, add your own special "spice of life" to it. It's, as it's said in computer lingo, "user friendly."

Basic Ingredients:

  • One Father; any age, height, weight, color.
  • One Family, comprised of anywhere between 1 and 100 people, all somehow related to the above.
  • One free day's worth of time.
  • A lot of desire to have a good, memorable time together.
This is where personal touch comes in. I've included some ideas of my own. Past experiences that have proven to be successful or at least memorable in a good way.

Golf anyone?

So you say the family all doesn't golf? That's why God created Putt-Putt (or miniature golf). Nothing beats an afternoon outing in the warmth of the day, whacking away at a small green, pink, or yellow ball with a stick. And to top it off, a hole-in-one on the last hole nets the whole family free passes to a local theater. Sounds too good? Want more?

A suggested end to this fun-filled day includes cool down your favorite ice-cream parlor. Superman should be in season around now. If not, I recommend Rocky Road.

Easily substituted for ice cream is frozen yogurt or frozen custard.

Dinner and Movie.

There's that new flick that just came out. Dad mentioned that he wants to go see it... if he just had the time and someone to go see it with. On the way home afterwards, be sure to stop off at the local pizzeria and order the following:
  • Dad's Pie
  • 1 large pepperoni and sausage pizza
  • Extra cheese
  • Green peppers
  • Onions
  • Garlic Bread if they have it.

Does Dad like his morning java?

Surprise Father this year with a freshly roasted pound of his favorite coffee. What's that you say? Dad doesn't have a favorite coffee? May we suggest the following:
  • Sumatran Mandehaling
  • Kenyan AA, dark roast
  • Guatemalan Antigua
  • Colombian Supremo
Breakfast scones compliment good morning coffees. Here's a simple recipe that might get the kids involved.

 

Breakfast Scones

  • 4 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 4 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1 1/2 cups raisins
  • 1 cups (2 sticks) butter or margarine
  • 2 eggs
  • 1 cup milk
Heat over to 350 degrees. Mix together dry ingredients; add raisins. Add butter or margarine in small cubes, mixing with fingers until evenly blended. Whisk together milk and eggs; add slowly to flour and butter mixture. Mix dough with hands if needed.

Drop 1/2 cup amounts of dough onto two un-greased cookie sheets. Bake for 20 minute or until a golden brown. Serve hot with butter or honey if so desired.

 

Other Father's Days specials.

I can remember the classic meatloaf and potatoes. Afternoon picnics on the patio. Going out to that special restaurant reserved for special occasions, for special people.

Whatever you decide to do, do it for Dad. Spend time with him and make him smile once or twice. Have a good time in whatever you do so that years from now you might remember those times like I do.



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