Croissant French Toast

I'm a fan of the 12 count box of croissants that Costco sells. I always grab one when I'm there and then split it into freezer bags with 3-6 per bag (I have a family of 3 so that's what works for me). Then I enjoy sandwiches, lazy afternoon tea with a croissant and jam, and any other number of treats. But one of my absolute favorites is splitting a few lengthwise and creating some of the most wonderful French toast I've ever had.

Instead of using a typical dairy and egg-based batter for this recipe, I work in some flour and baking powder to help maintain and enhance the light, crispy texture of the croissants. Oh, and this lovely batter also does a beautiful job of working itself into those little air pockets in the pastry. The result is a piece of French toast begging to hold butter, maple syrup, and/or any other number of sauces and such.

In addition to the aforementioned butter and maple syrup, I recommend fresh fruit for serving with this glorious breakfast treat. I used peaches, but any stone fruit, pears, bananas, etc. will work. Pick what's in season and perfect because this dish deserves nothing less! Enjoy.

Croissant French Toast

  • 1 c. milk
  • 2 T. granulated sugar
  • 1 egg
  • ¼ tsp. salt
  • ¼ tsp. vanilla extract
  • ½ c. flour
  • 1 tsp. baking powder
  • 3 croissants, halved lengthwise

In a large bowl, whisk together the milk, sugar, eggs, salt, and vanilla extract until smooth. Add the flour and baking powder, stirring to combine until there are no lumps in the batter.

Heat a griddle over medium-high heat and coat with nonstick spray or oil. Dip the croissant halves in the batter, allowing excess to drip back into the bowl. Arrange in a single layer on the griddle.

Cook until golden brown on one side, about 3 to 5 minutes. Flip each half and continue to cook until golden brown on the second side. Serve warm with fresh fruit and maple syrup.

  • Yields: 3 servings
  • Preparation Time: 20 minutes

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