When Life Hands You Apples ...

Being nearly the middle of September and having recently arrived home from a trip up north to visit my parents and help with, among other things, picking apples, I'm finding myself drawn to projects involving the pile of apples sent home with us. There are thoughts of apple cake, apple squares and maybe baked apples. But first, before anything else, there are thoughts of applesauce.

I make applesauce the way my mother makes it and she learned from a long line of ladies that made it the same way. It's more a technique than a recipe and it's so simple, it's almost embarrassing. That said, it leaves an impression. The itty child joined us up north for the weekend and got a couple servings of applesauce one night for dinner. Later that night, upon digging into a small bite of apple squares, she exclaimed that the bars had applesauce in them! Any cooked apples had become synonymous with apple sauce, and for good reason. It's simple, but addictive!

My "recipe" for applesauce is actually too simple to present as anything more than a two-step instruction. First, peel, core and slice a pile of sweet cooking apples. Then, place the apples in a heavy saucepan and cook them over medium-low heat until they are softened, mixing occasionally as the sauce forms. Add sugar and cinnamon as desired once a sauce begins to form.

That's it. That's how I make applesauce. Depending on the time of the year and the sweetness of the apples, sometimes my applesauce is made entirely of apples, as sugar or cinnamon never make it into the pot and the sauce that results is super on its own. Other times, a little sugar and cinnamon add just the right touch. It's definitely a flexible "recipe" to enjoy.

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