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October 2003 Issue
by Ronda L. Halpin
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    "You cannot sell a blemished apple in the supermarket, but you can sell a tasteless one provided it is shiny, smooth, even, uniform and bright."

    -Elspeth Huxley

Welcome to the October issue of Seasoned Cooking. October is a time of year when the last of the harvest is at its peak. It's a great time to enjoy everything from apples to squash and many other delightful kitchen additions. Seasoned Cooking is here to help you enjoy them all and more.

We begin with a look at some great seasonal fruits. First, visit the Happy Endings column to get a simple and satisfying fruit crisp featuring the super combination of sweet apples and tart cherries. The only thing that can make that marriage better is a crust that's both sweet and crunchy. If you're looking for something to take to the office potluck or football tailgate party, consider the creative layered pumpkin bar recipe that's presented in Seasoned Cooking's newest column, Ingredient SpotLight. This month's focus is on pumpkins, so stop by to get some background and a few recipes that will have you enjoying pumpkin from sunrise to sunset. Speaking of sunrise, you'll want to stop in at the Rise 'n Shine column to start your day right with a hot cereal recipe that combines creamy oatmeal, tangy dried fruit and your favorite granola to create a bowl that's a taste, texture and energy sensation.

Of course, when we think of October, it's nearly impossible to ignore Halloween. This spookiest of all holidays falls at the end of the month and Seasoned Cooking is doing its best to get you ready for the festivities. First, you can take advantage of the low cost and simple decorating ideas offered in this month's Halloween's Here feature to get your home ready for all sorts of ghost and goblin visits. Then, you'll want to make sure your own trick-or-treaters are fueled for their scary adventures. Visit Through the Kitchen Window to get recipe ideas and thoughts on costumes from Rossana as she travels down memory lane with ideas from past Halloweens. And, of course, we're going to want to hear about your Halloween favorites as well. In Seasoned Opinions, we're asking you to share your favorite Halloween treats.

While other people are using corn husks to decorate their homes and yards, Phil is using them to smoke salmon! Visit Phil's International Flair to get detailed instructions on how to smoke your own foods at home ... using tools you probably already own. If smoked salmon isn't what you're craving, you can also visit the Rush Hour column for a surprisingly simple stuffed chicken breast recipe that features a delightful goat cheese filling. It's so elegant, you can serve it when entertaining and so easy, you can make it mid-week. Maybe entertaining shouldn't be limited to the weekend!

There's a lot more to enjoy in this month's issue of Seasoned Cooking -- from your colder weather guide to vitamin D to a selection of healthy dips that you'll be proud to serve at your next football party. Enjoy and here's to a seasoned lifestyle.

    Ronda L. Halpin
    Editor-in-Chief


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