You are here: Seasoned Cooking » All Issues » June 2005 Issue » This Article » Page 2
 
June 2005 Issue
12 Best Foods
by Ronda L. Halpin
Table of Contents | Single-page view
Page

Related Sites

Factory Direct Craft Supply

Craft and wedding supplies at discount prices. Lace, wood, wedding, rusted, candle and soapmaking and many more craft supplies. Visit our website o...

Unique Baskets

Beautiful gift baskets filled with gourmet foods and snacks

Jane Butel Southwestern Cooking School

The Jane Butel Southwestern Cooking School offers weekend and week long participation classes focusing on Southwestern cuisine. The school was rate...

Welcome To IPTV Recipes!

IPTV Recipes is a FREE and exclusive home cooks' community where you can share and browse delectable recipes, have your own channel, upload cooking...

Carolina Country Cooking

Real Southern Recipes, Free Cookbooks, Facts, And Fiction From The Blue Ridge Mountains Of North Carolina
Just seeing the list of the 12 best foods is enough to make your mouth water, but the recipes take it a step further. Here are a few choice examples for you to try out.

 

Spinach Salad with Nectarine, Blueberries and Lime Balsamic Vinaigrette

With nectarines available nearly all year long, you can enjoy this salad almost anytime. I actually like it best in the winter, when the tartness of imported nectarines seems to make it even more refreshing. Tossing fresh mint with the spinach adds an unexpected flavor.
  • 4 cups baby spinach (4 ounces)
  • 1/4 cup mint leaves
  • Juice of 1/2 lime
  • 2 teaspoons balsamic vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon chopped shallot
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • Freshly ground black pepper
  • 1 nectarine, thinly sliced
  • 1/2 cup fresh blueberries, or 1/4 cup dried
  1. Place the spinach in a large mixing bowl. Stack the mint leaves and cut them crosswise into thin strips. Toss the mint with the spinach.

  2. For the dressing, combine the lime juice, vinegar, shallot, and salt in a small bowl. Whisk in the oil. Season the dressing to taste with pepper.

  3. Pour the dressing over the greens, tossing to coat lightly. Divide the dressed spinach among 4 salad plates. Fan one-quarter of the nectarine slices on 1 side of each plate. Sprinkle the blueberries over the spinach. Serve immediately.
  • Makes 4 servings
  • Per serving: 72 calories, 4 g fat, 0 g saturated fat, 1 g protein, 10 g carbohydrates, 2 g fiber
  • Food Fact: The vitamin C in lime juice can help your body absorb the iron in spinach.
 

 

Roast Chicken Waldorf Salad

Fennel and toasted nuts give a new twist to this salad with creamy dressing. Instead of waiting for leftovers from a roast chicken, you can make it using a barbecued breast from the store.

Salad

  • 2/3 cup coarsely chopped walnuts
  • 2 cups diced roast chicken breast (8 ounces)
  • 1 Granny Smith apple, peeled, cored, and cut in 3/4"cubes
  • 2 wild fennel bulbs, or 1/4 medium fennel bulb, chopped
  • 6 cups shredded red leaf, romaine, or Boston lettuce, or any combination
Dressing
  • 2 tablespoons low-fat whipped dressing
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • Pinch of cayenne pepper
  1. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Spread the nuts in 1 layer on a baking sheet. Toast until they are fragrant and lightly colored, 10 minutes, stirring after 3 minutes and again after 6 minutes so they toast evenly. Set the nuts aside to cool.

  2. In a mixing bowl, combine the chicken, apple, fennel, and nuts.

  3. For the dressing, in a small bowl, whisk together the whipped dressing, lemon juice, salt, black pepper, and red pepper, adjusting the seasoning to taste. Pour the dressing over the chicken mixture, tossing until the salad is evenly coated.

  4. To serve, divide the lettuce among 4 dinner plates and mound the chicken salad equally over the greens.
  • Makes 4 servings
  • Per serving: 279 calories, 16 g fat, 2 g saturated fat, 22 g protein, 16 g carbohydrates, 5 g fiber
  • Wild fennel bulbs are long and slim. You can find them at an increasing number of supermarkets as well as farmers' markets, particularly during the summer and fall. They should be thinly sliced, as they are crunchier (some would say tougher) than the bulbous fennel we are used to. They also have a more pronounced anise flavor.
 

Previous Page Next Page


Comments Disabled

 
Copyright © 2011 Seasoned Cooking
Authors also retain limited copyrights.